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Because Digital Writing Matters

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Published on: 06/22/2011

When/Where: Sunday, 9:45-10:30am in Frampton.

Presenters: Robert Rivera-Amezola, Philadelphia Writing Project; Meeno Rami, Philadelphia Writing Project; Christina Cantrill, National Writing Project. Presider: Jennifer Cioffi.

Objectives: This session explores emerging ideas and classroom practices related to literacy learning that support students in developing as reflective readers, thinkers and media composers.

Audience: PK-12 Schooling, Higher Education, Educational Administration & Policy

Description

(Please note — This is an updated submission; please replace previously submitted proposal uploaded on Jan 4th)

In the fall of 2010, the National Writing Project released the book, Because Digital Writing Matters, (Jossey-Bass) and launched a related website, Digital Is (digitalis.nwp.org). Together, they provide a forum for teacher leaders from across the country to share classroom vignettes, pedagogical approaches, reflections and student work related to their digital writing practice. The book, in particular, defines digital writing and examines new digital media and writing instruction through discussions with teachers of digital writing practices and ecologies, as well as through examination of their curricular goals and assessments. The website then provides an opportunity for teachers to surface their digital writing practice through the exploration of student work and feedback as well as through the explicit documentation of their own inquiries and learning.

This session will examine the idea that to be literate today means having the ability to engage effectively with all forms of media. We will therefore look at emerging ideas and practices related to literacy learning from the perspective of writing teachers from across grade levels and content areas and invite participants to raise their own key questions and inquiries into the conversation. This workshop will be facilitated by local Philadelphia Writing Project teacher leaders, who have their own practices with digital media and writing in their lives and classrooms and support their students in developing as reflective readers, thinkers and media composers.

Participant Involvement

Building from a key social practice of the writing project whereby teachers of writing, in order to be effective, need to write themselves and reflect on their practices as learners and teachers, we believe similarly that teachers of digital writing and media literacy need opportunities to write, compose and create digitally, coupled with opportunities to reflect with colleagues across emerging fields of digital media and literacy learning. The approach of this session therefore will be to give participants prompts and opportunities to bring forward and reflect upon their own experiences in these areas and respond to the experiences and work examples of others. If appropriate and with approval of participants, conversations and key questions and ideas from this session will be captured and shared digitally.

Presenter(s)

  • Robert Rivera-Amezola, Philadelphia Writing Project: Robert Rivera-Amezola is a fourth grade teacher at Frances E. Willard Elementary School in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Mr. Rivera incorporates multimedia into classroom learning and says that podcasts motivate his English language learners to extend their new language skills as they tackle complex subjects. Working together, Mr. Rivera and his fourth-graders conduct research, write scripts, and record audio broadcasts for publication on the Internet. Through his affiliation with the Philadelphia Writing Project, Mr. Rivera has led local and national workshops on podcasting for publishing student work and the use of digital tools to develop critical digital literacies. Mr. Rivera also serves on the Leadership Team of the National Writing Project’s English Language Learners Network.
  • Meeno Rami, Philadelphia Writing Project: Meenoo Rami teaches 9th and 10th grade English at Franklin Learning Center in Philadelphia. This past year, Meenoo has started using blogs as another way to engage students in meaningful writing experiences and you can see some of her students’ work here: mrami.edublogs.org. In addition, Meenoo has also started a weekly national discussion on topics related to teaching English on twitter. You can learn more info here: engchat.pbworks.com. You can follow Meenoo’s daily adventures in the classroom on twitter: www.twitter.com/mrami2.
  • Christina Cantrill, National Writing Project:
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