Download the…
Follow Us On…
Use Twitter Hashtags…

New media literacy in the 21st century society: Key findings, gaps and recommendations

Comments: No Comments
Published on: 06/22/2011

When/Where: Sunday, 1:45-2:10pm in Ballroom A2.

Presenters: Victor Chen, National Institute of Education, Nanyang Technological University. Presider: Caitlin Barry.

Objectives: This presentation examines the linguistic and socio-cultural characteristics of new media, and components of new media literacy from a functionality-criticality and consuming-prosuming perspectives.

Audience: PK-12 Schooling, Educational Administration & Policy

Description

New media literacy in the 21st century society: Key findings, gaps and recommendations

Chen, Der-Thanq & Wu, Jing

National Institute of Education, Nanyang Technological University,

Singapore

With new media becoming an integral part of life, it is imperative to develop new media literacy to participate responsibly in the 21st century. This review examines the linguistic and socio-cultural characteristics of new media, and the components of new media literacy from a functionality-criticality and consuming-prosuming (media production and online participation) perspectives (Chen, Wu, & Wang, in press). Using these two dimensions as a lens, we review the prevailing literature on new media learning in the last decade, and identified the key findings, gaps and recommendations, for future directions (Table 1).

Based on our review, there are 5 general findings. New media learning transcends formal and informal learning although most researchers argue that it is more powerful in the informal settings (F1). Regardless of pedagogical intervention and contexts, most studies reported that students are able to create multimodal artefacts and new genres (F2). Through production, students are also more aware of the audiences (F3). Critical reading (media consuming) is effective for new media learning (F4).Social networking has emerged as a new kind of purpose for engagement in new media spaces apart from conventional purposes such as the political, economical, educational ones. However, empirical studies are yet forthcoming (F5).

Researchers have made 5 recommendations for future studies. They are: R1, to study the multimodality and emerging genres in youths’ new media production; R2, to examine the youths’ participation and production with new media; R3, to understand media learning beyond the classroom; R4, to examine how media learning relates to other areas of learning; and R5, to adopt an introspect view and ethnographic approach to studies in new media.

Based on the two dimensions of Table 1, we identified 2 major gaps. While critical reading has been effective in fostering new media learning, there are few studies on how media prosumption has enhanced students’ understanding of how media is constructed (G1). Similarly, there are few studies on the impact of media prosumption on helping students understand the embedded social values and ideology (G2). We conclude this paper by suggesting an ecologic approach to new media learning, which involves media-literate educators, peers in affinity groups, supportive media workers and program designers, and involving parents. Such a holistic approach would facilitate the development of the new media literacy, a foundation for their effective citizenship in the in the 21st century society.

Table 1: Key findings, gaps and recommendations in new media learning

Characteristics of media

Components of media literacy

Media Language Constructed Message Social values/

Ideologies Purposes

Functional Literacy Functional Consuming

(access and understand media content at textual level)/

Functional Consuming

(use new media device to create media content) F1, F2,

R1N.A.N.A.N.A.

Critical Literacy Critical Consuming

(analyse, evaluate, critique and synthesize media content)F4

Critical Prosuming Produce

(create media content and understand its social impact)F3,

R1,R2F3,

G1G2R2

Participate

(participate in online affinity groups)R2G1G2F5,R2

Participant Involvement

Presentation and Question and Answer

Presenter(s)

  • Victor Chen, National Institute of Education, Nanyang Technological University : Dr Chen is faculty with the Curriculum, Teaching and Learning Academic Group, National Institute of Education, Nanyang Technological University. He is also the Head and the Online Community and Society Research Track Leader for the Learning Sciences Laboratory (LSL) in NIE. He obtained his PhD in Curriculum and Instruction/Computers in Education from the University of Oregon, Eugene, Oregon, USA. He also received his Masters of Science in Instructional Systems Technology from the same university. Dr Chen is a graduate of National Taiwan Normal University, Taipei, Taiwan, ROC where he majored in Physics/Science Education.His research interests include: community of practice, virtual learning environments and e-learning. Dr Chen has a special interest in Information Technology and had won the second prize in the National College Software Design Contest, Taiwan, ROC in 1985. He has been on the review panel for educational journals and publications. He was the Guest Editor for the special issue on Learning Sciences, Educational Media International in 2006 and in 2005, he was a review board member for IEEE International Conference on Advanced Learning Technologies (ICALT) and the Journal Research and Practice in Technology Enhanced Learning.
No Comments - Leave a comment

Leave a comment

Find Sessions by…

Welcome , today is Thursday, 09/18/2014